Uncategorized

A bushel of bad apples

Civilian deaths are worth whatnow?

The link above presents some interesting math:

The next day Redam Jassim was summoned to a local police station. “The Americans offered me 5,000 dollars, and told me it wasn’t compensation but because of tradition,” Jassim told IPS. The U.S. military pays usually 2,500 dollars compensation for killing an Iraqi. Jassim says he refused the payment.

The U.S. military recently announced in a Defence Department report provided to Congress that it paid out 19 million dollars in compensation to Iraqis last year — half of which paid out by Marines in al-Anbar province west of Baghdad.

The military claimed the amount was paid in 600 separate incidents, but it is common knowledge in Iraq that the usual payout for a non-combat civilian death is 2,500 dollars.

A payment of 19 million dollars compensation at 2,500 dollars a person would suggest such killings in thousands.

7600 civilian killings, assuming the $2,500 figure is accurate and constant and that no haggling goes on. It takes a lot of bad apples to ‘mistakenly’ kill 7600 civilians.

This is a promising development, although it won’t go anywhere (the US does have a veto on the UNSC, correct?).

A week after Iraq’s prime minister, Nuri al-Maliki, asked for a review of the immunity that has been granted to foreign troops, Iraqi Human Rights Minister Wijdan Michael said the review is now underway, reports Reuters. She added that a request to end the immunity could be ready for the United Nations, under whose mandate the US-led forces serve in Iraq, in August.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “A bushel of bad apples

  1. 7600 is probably a high guess, as I’d be willing to bet that a lot gets dished out for other purposes too. However, judging from the reports I’ve read and from iraqibodycount, it is certainly in the right ballpark.

    Yes, the Americans have a veto, so the Iraqi move is purely for form.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s